122011.02

Children shop for traditional lanterns at Fuzimiao, or the Confucius Temple, in Nanjing, capital of east China's Jiangsu Province, Feb. 5, 2011.. ...details

122011.02

Feb. 5, 2011, the third day of the Chinese lunar New Year of Rabbit shows lanterns at a lantern fair in Sanlitun area of Beijing, capital of China. The lantern fair opened here was held as a celebration of the traditional Chinese Spring Festival. ...details

122011.02

Tourists visit a lantern fair in Yangzhou City, east China's Jiangsu Province, Feb. 5, 2011, the third day of the Chinese lunar New Year of Rabbit. The lantern fair opened here was held as a celebration of the traditional Chinese Spring Festival. ...details

122011.02

Lanterns made in Foshan, south China's Guangdong Province, are about to be transfered to Hong Kong, south China, in Foshan, Feb. 7, 2011... ...details

132011.01

The traditional Chinese lunar calendar has been used in China for over three millennia. It counts the years in sixty-year cycles, utilizing combinations of two ...details

132011.01

The Spring Festival is the most important and biggest festival in China. To the Chinese people it is as important as Christmas to people in the West. It is the first ...details

132011.01

Similar to the importance of the Christmas Day for the westerners, the Spring Festival is the most important celebration for Chinese people.Although the meaning ...details

132011.01

"Fu", one of the Chinese characters that best epitomize China's time-honored culture, is a must in Spring Festival celebrations. Nowadays, "fu," literally meaning ...details

132011.01

The year 2011 is the "Year of the Rabbit" under the 12-year Chinese lunar calendar in which each year is named after one of the twelve Chinese zodiac animals in turn ...details

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